Cloud Banner

Low-Glycemic Diet vs. Low-Carb Diet: Which Is Healthier?

Cloud Banner

The Low-Glycemic Diet? Your doctor may have advised you to start “watching your carb intake” during your most recent yearly visit if your HbA1c (MedlinePlus's three-month average of blood sugar levels) rose to hazardous levels.

Cloud Banner

The low-glycemic diet emphasizes low-glycemic foods over high-glycemic ones but doesn't necessitate carb cutting. Apples, macaroni salad, and cookies all have glycemic index values from 0 to 100.

Cloud Banner

 Mostly fruits, vegetables, legumes, yogurt, and nuts have a GI of 55 or less. These low-glycemic meals are recommended for frequent consumption. However, meals with a GI of 70 or greater are high GI. Baked items, white rice, white bread, and cereals are examples. 

Cloud Banner

Definition of low-carb diet Low-carb diets limit carb intake daily. So popular is the low-carb diet that it has several varieties, such as the Atkins, Whole 30, and South Beach diets, each with its own guidelines. 

Cloud Banner

The low-carb diet restricts carbohydrate intake to a percentage of daily calories or a set gram number. From the Low-Carbohydrates Diet, a low-carb diet is less than 26% of daily calories from carbs or 130 grams of carbs. 

Cloud Banner

 The keto diet is different from low-carb. The keto diet has less than 10% of calories from carbs, or 20 to 50 grams per day—hardly enough to consume a banana! EatingWell advises against consuming less than 120 grams of carbs per day or 40% of calories from carbs.

Cloud Banner

Reduced carb intake may hinder you from getting enough vitamins, minerals, and fiber from carb-rich foods including fruits, veggies, whole grains, and legumes. If eaten in excess, keto diet foods like bacon, butter, and full-fat cheese may harm heart and intestinal health. 

LIKE SHARE AND SAVE

CLICK HERE FOR MORE STORIES